Wednesday, February 7, 2018

I'm an Official Guest!

Today I have a guest post up on a website called "The YA Literature, Media, and Culture Research Network." I stumbled across them a bit ago, and enjoyed their academic take on YA. They expressed interest in reaching across the aisle, as it were, to more pop culture enthusiasts, so I submitted my take on what is and what should be the canon for YA lit.  Check it out and leave me (and them) some love!

Canon in YA

What works would you put on the YA canon?
What does "canon" mean to you in this context?

Not this kind of canon.

Nor this kind.

This one isn't even spelled the same!

And you'll only get this if you've visited the Oregon coast.

Okay, I'm done now. Promise.



13 comments:

  1. I'm going to comment on your article on your own page but if you'd like me to post it on YALMC page I'll do that too. I LOVED your article. I think the world needs to stop missing the forest for the trees. We're so locked into The Crucible, The Scarlet Letter, To Kill a Mockingbird, and oh so much more, that they miss the fact that Aristotle and Dante (I LOVE THAT BOOK), Gabi, A Girl in Pieces, and Ramona Blue are just as important, if not more important for the young adult readers (and non-readers).

    This is a great post. I look forward to reading more.

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    1. Thank you for visiting and commenting! I definitely think that books that are older still have great value, but so do the modern books. Especially, as you say, for the non-readers who need to get excited about reading.

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  2. Since the canon is often determined by what is taught in schools and discussed by academics, I'd have to say that the YA canon is likely to end up including The Hunger Games, Harry Potter, Twilight, and John Green--mainly because, when I look at YA panels in academia, they all seem to be about ten years behind the times and that's what they're just discussing now.

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    1. I don't know much about YA in academia, but that sounds right to me. I'm sure academic studies of any type of literature lags somewhat behind current reading.

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  3. I love your list of 21st century canon. When I was in middle school we mostly read older YA books. I remember being assigned Catcher in the Rye, The Giver, The Outsiders, The Black Stallion, and Tuck Everlasting. Those are all great books, but they were all 10+ years old when I read them. They didn’t really reflect the world I lived in. I loved my graduate school because they (mostly) let me choose my own reading list. I read tons of modern YA. If teachers want to inspire a love of reading in their students, then they should probably let the kids read some modern stuff. It’s more relatable and relevant to their lives.

    Aj @ Read All The Things!

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    1. EXACTLY. I just think there are so many great YA books being written now; why wouldn't a teacher use them?

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  4. This is awesome! What an opportunity/experience for you!

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    1. It was pretty fun to participate in a more academic discussion and possibly with different readers.

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  5. Classics I think the original list missed that today's readers should still read: Lord of the Flies; Nineteen Eight Four; Of Mice and Men; Things Fall Apart; and To Kill a Mockingbird; Night (Weisel)

    Nonclassics: The Book Thief; Going Bovine; Looking for Alaska; Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe; The Hate U Give; I'll Give You the Sun; Stolen; Eleanor and Park: Hunger Games; Dodger (Pratchett); Jasper Jones; Nothing (Teller); Revolver (Segwick)

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  6. Oooh, good ones, Anne! I am not familiar with Nothing, and I still need to read Dodger and Jasper Jones. I kind of hate Lord of the Flies, but then again, that's kind of the point of the book.

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  7. I commented over on the guest post, Wendy! :-)

    Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction

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