Wednesday, January 8, 2020

2019 In Review, With Pie (and Bars)


Number of books read: 200

I intentionally set my Goodreads overall goal low in 2019, at 52 books. I passed that up by summer, and didn't pay attention to it any longer. Then on Dec. 31st, I noticed I had read 199 books. Well.  I pulled out one of the shorter books I'd brought home to read over break and powered through it. For the record, I don't count picture books towards my total, but I do count graphic novels, re-reads, audiobooks, and read alouds. Then again, there's an 8 book discrepancy between my Goodreads and personal records, which doesn't bother me enough to spend the time figuring it out. 




Average rating: 3.98 or 4.1
My personal rating average is a bit lower than my Goodreads rating average, since I use half points for 3 and above on my own scale, and round up for Goodreads. But yes, I read books I like, and I like books I read.


and because I know you want to know...

Titles I gave "all the stars" to:
This is very subjective. If I feel, in the first moments after reading the book, that five stars is just not enough, then I toss this rating at it. Looking back at all the books I've read, I can see some that now seem like they were as meaningful and wonderful, or even more so, then these, but this was my first reaction. Maybe that means these all have unusually satisfying endings!

The Toll by Neal Shusterman. An amazing finale to a world-class series. Just wow.
Seraphina and Tess of the Road by Rachel Hartman. I can't believe I've never read this fantasy author before. I love her world building, her protagonists, and the complications of dragon-human relationships.
Redwood and Ponytail by K. A. Holt is a novel in verse that really engages the emotions fully. 
Here is a graphic novel unlike anything I've read before. It shows one location over thousands of years, winding back and forth in time with very little context. 
Maybe He Just Likes You by Barbara Dee is another middle grade novel that blew me away. I even got it for my daughter for Christmas, despite knowing her love of horror. 
Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D. Schmidt is simply one of my lifetime favorites, and re-reading it to another class this year had as much of an impact as it always has.


Publication Dates

About 1/3 new, another 1/3 a year old, and the remaining 1/3 backlist. This looks a lot like last year's data, but nothing at all like before I started blogging, when it would have been 90% backlist.




Source
This is not a very exciting graph, so I'll just tell you. Half from the public library, 40% from my classroom, and the remaining 10% either owned, borrowed, gifted, or won.  Again, this is quite comparable to previous years.

Me and my white American women authors. Sheesh.
Third year in a row when around 65% of my authors were women, 74% of my authors were white, and 82% of my authors were American. 

I tracked my familiarity with authors this year, and it looks like it's about half and half familiar and new authors.



And while I need to read a wider range of authors, I do have some diversity represented in my reading.  "POV character who is a member of an under-represented group" is a catch-all.  Ignore the percentages here, since it's just out of the books I answered this question for, not all the ones I read.



Genres, formats, audience
The numbers add up to more than the books read, because I chose multiple genres when applicable. I've decided to not do that in 2020, which may make me crazy when I read historical mysteries.These stats also don't change much year to year. A little more sci fi and a little less fantasy this year; a little more mystery and a little less contemporary, but my overall preferences remain steady. Within that, I read a lot of YA and an impressive (for me) amount of MG. 





Modality Used

Just for fun, here are my 2020 and 2019 pie charts for each of these. That's...pretty dang consistent.





I'll be back soon (well, before the end of January!) with a list of top picks in various categories. 

Happy Reading!

and in case you were lured here on false pretenses, here's another pie and bar.


Image result for raspberry pie  Image result for library bar


5 comments:

  1. I just read a book called How to be Miserable, and I feel like I must point out that you have exhibited a mastery of several techniques in the book. I feel like I must encourage you to look on your stats from a much gentler point of view (and, I think, a more objective pov). What were your goals, setting out? Fifty-two books, right. And what did you end up with? Two hundred. Wow. And you don't even count picture books. Wow. And as for your concerns with your stats about white American women authors? How many non-white, non-American, non-women authors did you hope to read this year? And let's flip those stats and see that 35% were non-women, 26% non-white, and 18% non-American. You should feel happy and proud, I think. Certainly, don't beat yourself up...we've got the whole world who is ready to take on that job at any moment.

    Haha, love your conclusion.

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  2. Haha, I love the pie and the bar. I posted my 2019 graphs today too! I also mostly read white American women. Every year I say I’m going to fix that, but then I don’t.

    Aj @ Read All The Things!

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  3. Interesting stats. My favorite thing is that you have an "all the stars" rating. Fantastic!

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  4. Loved reading about your All the Stars books! I definitely agree about The Toll. It was a fantastic ending to that series. I also listed Maybe He Just Likes You as a favorite for the year. Now I want to read your others too! (Especially Redwood and Ponytail, since I love KA Holt.

    Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction

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  5. LOL with the pie and bar (I thought maybe the bar referred to another baked treat--can you tell I like my cookies?). I have loved everything Gary Schmidt has written, so how did I not read Orbiting Jupiter yet? I just added it to my Amazon wishlist to remind myself to get a copy. I just got the first book in Shusterman's series for Christmas this year, so it will be fun to binge read later on.

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