Sunday, March 27, 2016

SOL #28: Found Poem



Sally at My Writing Stories that Only I Can Tell posted a found poem, taking it from an earlier Slice she'd written.  Since I already stole an idea from her daughter, I thought I'd continue the tradition and steal this one from her!

I went back to day 19 for my slice, which was about the experience of having written for that many days in a row.

I copied it into a Google Doc, and highlighted words and phrases that jumped out to me, without paying much attention to how they'd work together.  Then I went back and highlighted everything else in black.  I did a little editing here, adding some words in yellow, blacking out some previously highlighted words that didn't work that well with the rest.  My rule for myself was that I couldn't do anything I couldn't have done on paper--that is, I could black over yellow, but not yellow over black.

The finished poem piece looks like this:


Or, if it's easier to read:

Number nineteen, really?

I've written every day.
In my excitement, neck and back pain
Hunched over my computer.

Pain has abated!
Handscrawled journals in blank books
Inspiration
Handle my pain and passion

I've taken a few risks
(too sleepy to innovate)
dabbled,
dove into the deep end,
rambled freely.
Toss off six words.

A mix of lit fans and teachers of reading and writing.
Enthusiasts.
Experience trumps the writing.
We're all Word People, of course.

People are deliberate about their writing.
The focus is on writing itself.
Writers play,
"How are they telling this tale?
What is moving me?
How are they doing that?"

Thank you.
Thank you.
Thank you.
Thanks.

Nineteen days in a row.

Written as part of the Slice of Life March writing challenge sponsored by Two Writing Teachers



12 comments:

  1. Love this idea! Thank you for taking the time to explain the process!

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  2. Genius idea. Thanks for the explanation, too. I'm going to use this idea and method during April, national poetry month. Good end result, too.

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  3. I love found poems. They are a way of synthesizing. Seeing what you didn't see before. Lovely!

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  4. I love the backwards motion of using a past piece for something in the present. What would it look like if you changed your rules and said, the blackout poem could only be something done digital and NOT on paper? Hmmm
    Kevin

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  5. what a great way to take a piece of previously written text and transform it digitally. Your picture helped me imagine it. I may have to steal the idea from you!

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  6. what a great way to take a piece of previously written text and transform it digitally. Your picture helped me imagine it. I may have to steal the idea from you!

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  7. I liked reading it with the blacked out and highlighted pieces. I think this appeals to us so much because as you say so well, "We're all word people of course."

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  8. Reading slices, experimenting with formats, that's the wonderful journey this month takes everyone on. Who knew there was a poem hiding in slice #19?

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  9. Clever and illuminating. Hurray for the ingenuity of Slicers! You've now set the bar high for the final days.

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  10. I can't wait to do Found Poems with my class! I like this stanza most: "A mix of lit fans and teachers of reading and writing.
    Enthusiasts.
    Experience trumps the writing.
    We're all Word People, of course."

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  11. Dana Murphy taught me about blackout poetry. I haven't tried this in awhile. You're slice is making me think it's time to try it again.

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  12. It's perfection. That's crazy. I've seen this done so many times but maybe because it's two slicers it works out so brilliantly. It glows with how it feels to do this challenge. Love this!

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